How To Optimise Your Blog Photos

I think it’s pretty safe to assume that we all start out in the blogging world, because we’re passionate about it. We love to create, and we love it even more when other people love what we have created.

But it can be a little disheartening if you are avidly creating and developing ideas, if your content is never seen. Therefore we all quickly start to learn little tips and tricks for correctly tagging and sharing our posts, in order to get them in front of the right people. So today, I thought I’d share with you guys, my tips for how to optimise your blog images, so that you are using every available tool for showcasing your blog/online space in the best possible way.How To Optimise Your Blog Photos

Starting out with optimising your images can be as simple as correctly naming your file. For example, the image above is related to this post, “How To Optimise Your Blog Photos”, therefore that’s what I named this file after I transferred it onto my computer, and before uploading it to this post. I know this sounds really useless and obvious, but think of just how many images you take directly from your camera and upload to your blog, without thinking about it. It’s as simple as this, I want people to find this post when looking for tips on how to improve optimisation on their blog photos, therefore that’s what I named the image, so when it’s searched for, this post will appear.

No one ever searches for “IMG_567” or “FPEBDWR”. Your file names must be relevant and useful.

Secondly, there is also ‘Alternative Text’. Alternative text is separate from the file name, and it essentially identifies what the picture is. It’s the text that shows up on screen when a picture doesn’t load properly. This essentially tells whoever is searching for a specific keyword, what is in the image. So if you take a picture of a Lush Bubble Bar, you’ll want to add Lush and Bubble Bar to the alternative text tags.

And lastly, keep file sizes small. People don’t like to be waiting 3 minutes for an image to load. Most will wait roughly 15 seconds before getting tired of waiting and moving on, and that’s not what you want. You want people to love your content and want to return regularly, not click on a link once and never return because your image loaded bar by bar.


That’s it! I hope this post helped some of my fellow blogging buddies out, be sure to let me know if it did! Also, if you’re a seasoned professional in the world of blogging, please do leave any tips you’ve acquired on this (or any similar topic) in the comments, as I’m sure we’d all love to share as much advice as possible.

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